Java Server Faces (JSF) : An Overview

JavaServer Faces (JSF) includes a set of predefined UI components, an event-driven programming model, and the ability to add third-party components. JSF is designed to be extensible, easy to use, and toolable. This refcard describes the JSF development process, standard JSF tags, the JSF expression language, and the faces-config.xml configuration file.

JavaServer Faces applications must be compliant with the Servlet specification, version 2.3 (or later) and the JavaServer Pages specification, version 1.2 (or later). All applications compliant with these specifications are packaged in a WAR file, which must conform to specific requirements in order to execute across different containers. At a minimum, a WAR file for a JavaServer Faces application must contain the following:

1). A web application deployment descriptor, called web.xml, to configure resources required by a web application.
2). A specific set of JAR files containing essential classes.
3). A set of application classes, JavaServer Faces pages, and other required resources, such as image files.
4). An application configuration resource file, which configures application resources.

The WAR file typically has this directory structure:

index.html
JSP pages
WEB-INF/
                 web.xml
                 faces-config.xml
                 tag library descriptors (optional)
                 classes/
                                  class files
                                  Properties files
lib/
                 JAR files


The web.xml file (or deployment descriptor), the set of JAR files, and the set of application files must be contained in the WEB-INF directory of the WAR file.




Sandeep Joshi
Mathematics, Technology and Programming are my passion. I am a part of Java Ecosystem and through this blog, I contribute to it. I am here to blog about my interests, views and experiences.
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